Belchers Marsh Park Trails

Trailhead:
Parkland Dr. GPS N 44° 40.186' W 063° 40.539'

Terrain and Surface:
This 2.5-km crusher dust trail is quite level with no winter maintenance.

Parking/Bus Route:
Parking is available on Parkland Dr. and nearby side streets; Bus Routes 4, 16 on Parkland Dr.

Rating:
This trail rated Fairly Easy.

Description:
These natural greenway trails around a large marsh and a smaller pond opposite Heathside Cres. have several access points. Interpretive panels inform about the cultural and natural assets. Activities for families might include observing wildlife (flora and fauna) in spring and summer, and skating in winter.

These trails rated Fairly Easy were built as part of Parkland contribution in the 1990's when the area was developed for mixed housing. Access is from Parkland Drive or any of the many linking pathways. The park may also be readily accessed from the Mainland North Linear Parkway via Langbrae or Farnham Gate Roads. The trail follows a route around the Marsh and the smaller pond visible from Parkland Drive. The two are linked by a wooded trail along the stream and crossing Parkland Drive. The complete loop is approximately 2.5 km.

Historically, this area has been used as an outdoor recreation resource in all seasons over the years. It is named after Andrew Belcher (1763-1841), son of Nova Scotia's first lieutenant governor Jonathan Belcher. Andrew was a successful merchant and landowner in his time. Hunting, fishing and skating were common in those early days. A traditional log cabin overlooking the marsh was the most recent evidence of the parks’ early use.

Belchers Marsh Park Trails

Trailhead:
Parkland Dr. GPS N 44° 40.186' W 063° 40.539'

Terrain and Surface:
This 2.5-km crusher dust trail is quite level with no winter maintenance.

Parking/Bus Route:
Parking is available on Parkland Dr. and nearby side streets; Bus Routes 4, 16 on Parkland Dr.

Rating:
This trail rated Fairly Easy.

Description:
These natural greenway trails around a large marsh and a smaller pond opposite Heathside Cres. have several access points. Interpretive panels inform about the cultural and natural assets. Activities for families might include observing wildlife (flora and fauna) in spring and summer, and skating in winter.

These trails rated Fairly Easy were built as part of Parkland contribution in the 1990's when the area was developed for mixed housing. Access is from Parkland Drive or any of the many linking pathways. The park may also be readily accessed from the Mainland North Linear Parkway via Langbrae or Farnham Gate Roads. The trail follows a route around the Marsh and the smaller pond visible from Parkland Drive. The two are linked by a wooded trail along the stream and crossing Parkland Drive. The complete loop is approximately 2.5 km.

Historically, this area has been used as an outdoor recreation resource in all seasons over the years. It is named after Andrew Belcher (1763-1841), son of Nova Scotia's first lieutenant governor Jonathan Belcher. Andrew was a successful merchant and landowner in his time. Hunting, fishing and skating were common in those early days. A traditional log cabin overlooking the marsh was the most recent evidence of the parks’ early use.